Wednesday, March 6, 2013

Birthdays, Fakebook, and Real Life

Yesterday was my nephew Chris' 21st birthday. He's an awesome character who is full of energy and confidence. Like others his age, he's into things. Not in a half-baked sort of way either. He lives, eats and breaths the stuff he likes. That in itself is awesome. And the fact he turned 21 yesterday, well, it warranted more than just some impersonal online acknowledgement. So Instead of jumping on the oh-so plastic Facebook to wish him "happy b-day dude!", I drove to his house to physically be there.

His dad had arranged for a men's night out at Murphy's, a local tavern. We went out, talked, drank and had a good time. We did all this in real time, not through some status update. Think you're going to snarf down a basket of Fish-n-Chips along with having a beer on Facebook? Not a chance.

The really foo-barred thing I've realized recently is that once I stopped using Facebook, my interactions with people have ground to a halt. Do people only communicate through Facebook now? It would seem so with only a few exceptions. Over past three weeks, excluding the time I spend onsite at my customer's and the time I spend at school, I have had only about three conversations. One was with my neighbor Robert. Yeah! A real conversation. Another interaction has been commentary back and forth with Mike, the fella who publishes BlogDogIt.com.  Mike always finds something unique to share be it a stop-motion film from James Dean or fire safety films about housewives who used gasoline for DIY dry-cleaning so the conversations are always interesting. And the other chance for conversation arrived last night when I spent time with my nephew. It's difficult finding real interactions that are enjoyable (where some time-bandit isn't talking your ear off because you're the only one who listens politely).

Facebook might be a convenient way for people to stay in touch, but it lacks in the personable sense that face to face conversations have. Facebook lacks the face part. Because in real life, there's an ability for morally corrupt Uncles to talk to their nephew about politically incorrect things that would give the feminists over at Jezebel epileptic seizures. Viva la freedom from Facebook, feminists and anything else that's overbearing. And I'm glad my nephew (and my niece) still want their family to be part of their life.